Looking back: Man awarded Medal of Honor, 12-year-old boy leaves home and mother of two children faces deportation


Utah Power Company, Idaho Falls, circa 1920. | Courtesy Idaho Falls Public Library

EAST IDAHO — EastIdahoNews.com is looking back in time at what life was like during this week in history.

This week is Dec. 6 to Dec. 12.

1900-1925

SUGAR CITY — Three American soldiers, including a man from Sugar City, were designated by President Woodrow Wilson in 1918 to receive the highest military decoration given by the United States for valor in action, the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Pvt. Thomas C. Neibaur of Sugar City, distinguished himself when the Rainbow division took Cote de Chatillon in October, The Rigby Star said on Dec. 12, 1918. The paper explained that Neibaur had “been sent out on patrol to enfilade (shoot) enemy machine gun nests with an automatic rifle.” After being wounded, he went on a ridge “toward which the enemy troops drove.”

“Although cut off from his regiment with the remainder of his detachment killed or wounded, Neibaur kept his automatic at work with such effect the attack was driven back,” the newspaper said. “Four Germans attacked him at close quarters, and these he killed.”

The Rigby Star added, “In spite of wounds through both knees, he completed the exploit by bringing in 11 Germans at the point of his pistol.”

Neibaur became the first Idaho soldier and the first member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter–day Saints to recieve the Medal of Honor.

1926-1950

RIGBY — A man was hurt by a “flying saw,” according to an article in The Rigby Star dated Dec. 10, 1936.

Bill Frisk “received painful injuries” while working with a wood-sawing crew at Riverside Gardens. The casting on the saw broke and hit Frisk in the face, knocking out two teeth and cutting a deep gash on his upper lip. Part of the broken saw also hit him on the shoulder, according to the paper.

“Both medical and dental treatment were necessary to take care of the injuries,” The Rigby Star added.

1951-1975

POCATELLO — A Pocatello boy left home after deciding he “wasn’t going to put up with any more injustices at home,” the Idaho State Journal said.

On Dec. 7, 1951, the 12-year-old took his sleeping bag and left home around 7:30 p.m., but the following day, he returned home around 3:30 a.m.

“It was too cold to sleep any longer in Ross Park,” the Idaho State Journal wrote.

The boy said he “had punished his parents long enough.”

1976-2000

POCATELLO — A Mexican mother was facing deportation and was evicted from the house she was renting, the Idaho State Journal said on Dec. 7, 1976.

The 21-year-old mother had a three-year-old girl and a two-year-old boy who were both citizens of the United States of America. According to a local representative of Advocates in Defense, the woman was a Mexican citizen who would “soon be deported to Mexico.”

The woman was separated from her husband and had “no means of support.” The children had no warm clothing for the winter, and they were in search of clothing, housing and food items.

It was reported the woman was “attempting to find a way to stay in the United States, but her immediate needs must be met first.”

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Source: Local News from EastIdahoNews.Com | Looking back: Man awarded Medal of Honor, 12-year-old boy leaves home and mother of two children faces deportation